30 Of The World’s Largest Dog Breeds

What Are Giant Dog Breeds?

giant dog breed is a breed of dog of giant proportions, sometimes described as a breed whose weight exceeds 45 kilograms (99 lb) Breeds sometimes described as giant breeds include the Great Dane, Newfoundland, St Bernard and Irish wolfhound. These breeds have seen a marked increase in their size since the 19th century.

Dog breeds described as giant tend to have more health problems than other smaller dogs and have the shortest life expectancy of dog breeds.

When it comes to dogs, we say the bigger the better; after all the bigger the pup the more love they can handle. Throughout history these very good (and very big) dogs have been bred for their strength and their size, whether that was to aid them in herding, hunting, or discouraging intruders. While it’s true that these animals can be downright intimidating because of their sizes, you might be surprised to learn that many of the biggest dogs not only have some of the best temperaments of any canines, but they also make great family pets! Whether you’re looking into adding a new addition to your family, or you’re just interested in learning some more about some giant puppies.

Here are 30 of the world’s largest dog breeds that you simply have to check out.

1.Scottish Deerhound

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/scottish-deerhound/

The Scottish Deerhound, or just Deerhound, is a tall breed of hound which was bred to hunt red deer in Scotland. Its antecedents were kept by the tribal people living in what is the modern day United Kingdom and were used in the hunting of large game such as deer and elk. Males can be over 32 inches (80 cm) tall, and weigh up to 110 pounds (50 kg), while females typically only reach 28 inches (70 cm) tall and weigh under 100 pounds (45 kg).24

2.Caucasian Shepherd Dog

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/caucasian-shepherd-dog/

Popular in Russia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Northern Caucasian area, the Caucasian shepherds are a member of a family of strongly-boned, muscular dog breeds referred to as molossers. Measuring about 28 inches (70 cm) tall for females and 30 inches (75 cm) tall for males, these large dogs are definitely not lap dogs.23

3.Newfoundland

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/newfoundland/

Originally bred and used as a work-dog for fishermen, Newfoundlands are huge, intelligent dogs famous for their excellent swimming abilities which make them excellent Search And Rescue (SAR) dogs. They typically have thick black, brown, or grey coats, and some Newfoundland males have been known to weigh over 200 pounds (90 kg) with the largest on record weighing 260 pounds (120 kg).22

4.English Mastiff

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/mastiff/

The English mastiff is one of the largest dog breeds in the world, especially in terms of body mass. The first mentions of these massive dogs date back to as early as the 6th century BCE, and during the Roman conquest of England Julius Caesar himself was reportedly impressed by the loyalty and strength of the English mastiffs. A typical male can weigh up to 250 pounds (113 kg), but the heaviest mastiff ever recorded was a jaw-dropping 343 pound (156 kg) dog called Zorba.21

5.Komondor

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/komondor/

Sometimes referred to as ‘mop dog,’ the Komondor is a long-established dog breed that has been used to guard livestock and other property. Easily recognizable thanks to its distinctive long and corded coat, not so different from that of a mop, the Komondor is a Hungarian breed which is currently being heavily monitored by the Hungarian government in order to preserve and protect it from modification. They can grow up to 31.5 inches (80 cm) high and weigh over 130 pounds (60 kg).20

6.Great Dane

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/great-dane/

Nicknamed “the Apollo of dogs,” the Great Dane is a German breed with a height that can reach 3 feet (91 cm) or more at the shoulder. In the past a number of Great Danes have held the record of the world’s tallest dog, including the current record-holder; a 44 inch (112 cm) tall Great Dane named Zeus. They are generally friendly toward other dogs, pets, and familiar humans, and although their average life span is 6 to 8 years, some Great Danes have reached 10 years or even more.19

7.Neapolitan Mastiff

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/neapolitan-mastiff/

Neapolitan mastiff is another popular breed of mastiff and, although not quite as large as the English mastiff, it is still quite large with the males can weighing  up to 155 pounds (60-70 kg) and females clockin g in around 130 pounds (50–60 kg). The Neapolitan mastiff is fearless and extremely protective of its home and family, while still being surprisingly intelligent and independent.18

8.Irish Wolfhound

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/irish-wolfhound/

Originally developed from war hounds, Irish wolfhounds have been used for hunting and guarding since possibly even as early as 7,000 BCE. Standing at least 34 inches (86 cm) tall, they are one of the tallest of all dog breeds. Their weight, however, only averages about 120 pounds (55 kg) for males and 105 pounds (48 kg) for females. Unlike many other breeds, Irish wolfhounds have a varied range of personalities and are most often noted for their quirks and individuality.17

9.Black Russian Terrier

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/black-russian-terrier/

A breed created in USSR during the late 1940s and the early 1950s for use as a military/working dog, the black Russian terrier is believed to be a cross of about 17 different dog breeds from across the world. Males stand 72 to 78 cm (28 – 30 inches) at the withers and weigh up to 60 kg (130 pounds), with females being slightly smaller and lighter. The black Russian terrier is a calm, confident, and self-assured dog, as well as highly intelligent and easy to train. They can live quite a bit longer than other breeds their size, often up to 14 years. However, they are known to be prone to certain hereditary diseases such as hip or elbow dysplasia.16

10.Great Pyrenees

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/great-pyrenees/

Occasionally referred to as the Pyrenean mountain dog, great Pyrenees dogs are just as well known for their instinctive nature to protect and herd as they are for their thick, white double coats that keep them warm in the snowy mountain winters they hail from. Bred to be sheep herders, these large dogs can grow to 32 inches (81 cm) and weigh 130 pounds (59 kg).15

11.Leonberger

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/leonberger/

Sometimes dubbed “gentle lions,” Leonbergers are a breed of giant dog whose name is derived from the city of Leonberg in Germany. Males average about 29.5 inches (75 cm) tall and can weigh between 140–150 pounds (64–68 kg), while females usually stand about 27.5 inches (70 cm) tall and weigh approximately 115 pounds (52 kg). The Leonberger is easily recognizable thanks to its generous, water resistant, double coat. These robust dogs are normally very loyal, intelligent, playful, and kind, which makes them ideal family pets. Unfortunately, their average life expectancy is about seven years.

If you’re enjoying learning about these large dog breeds, you should see them goofing off in our 25 ridiculously oversized dogs list.14

12.Tosa Inu

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASource: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/tosa/

Originally bred in Tosa (former Japanese province) as a fighting dog, the Tosa Inu is a rare, robust dog breed. These dogs vary considerably in size; with the Japanese breed generally weighing between 80 and 135 pounds (36 and 61 kg), while the non-Japanese breeders have focused on dogs that weigh from 130 to 200 pounds (60 to 100 kg). The Tosa is a descendant of the native Shikoku-Inu, an indigenous medium-sized dog which was crossbred with large European dog breeds such as mastiff, St. Bernard, Great Dane. 13

13.Bernese Mountain Dog

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/bernese-mountain-dog/

Originally kept as a general farm dog that accompanied herders in the Bern region, Switzerland, the Bernese mountain dog is a large, heavy breed with a distinctive tri-colored coat, black with white chest and rust colored markings. The height at the withers is 25–27.5 inches (64–70 cm) and weighs up to 125 pounds (57 kg) for males, females are just slightly smaller. Although the temperament of individual dogs may vary, Berneses are generally calm, self-assured, and docile dogs, friendly to children as well as to other pets.12

14.Boerboel

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/boerboel/

Bred as a guard dog, the Boerboel is a large, sturdy dog breed from South Africa. Their proportions are formidable – often measuring up to 27 inches (70 cm) tall and weighing over 220 pounds (100 kg). Boerboels are very obedient and intelligent dogs with strong territorial instincts. They are loyal, particularly great with kids, and tend to be protective of their family and territory. 11

15.Anatolian Shepherd

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/anatolian-shepherd-dog/

Anatolian shepherd dog is a big dog breed which originated in Turkey possibly as long as 6,000 years ago. Anatolian shepherds can stand over 31 inches (80cm) tall and weigh 150 pounds (68 kg,) however, due to their thick coat, they look even larger and heavier than they actually are. The breed was developed to be independent and forceful, responsible for guarding its master’s flocks over vast areas without human assistance.10

16.Dogo Argentino

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/dogo-argentino/

Developed in Argentina primarily for the purpose of big-game hunting, Dogo Argentino is a huge, muscular dog with a short, white coat. Males can grow up to 30 inches (76 cm) long and weigh over 120 pounds (55 kg).9

17.Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/greater-swiss-mountain-dog/

The Greater Swiss mountain dog is another large dog breed which was developed in the Swiss Alps. This big dog is robust and heavy-boned with great physical strength but is still agile enough to perform the all-purpose farm duties it was originally used for. Among all the Swiss mountain dogs, this breed is considered the oldest and largest with males often weighing well over 150 pounds (72 kg) and reaching heights of almost 30 inches (76 cm). The Greater Swiss is a happy, intelligent and sociable dog with an enthusiastic nature and a strong affinity to people and children.8

18.Akbash

Source: https://www.ukcdogs.com/akbash

Native to western Turkey, the Akbash was bred primarily as a livestock guardian dog and a shepherd dog. This medium to large dog breed weighs anywhere between 75 to 140 pounds (34 to 64 kg) and ranges from about 27 to 34 inches (69 to 86 cm) tall. The Akbash is leaner and sometimes taller than other Turkish livestock guardian dog breeds and, when protecting their charges, they are known for their tremendous power, focus, endurance, and perseverance.7

19.Bully Kutta

Source: https://www.dogmal.com/bully-kutta/

Also known as Pakistani Mastiff, the Bully Kutta is a descendant of the extinct Alaunt, an ancient dog breed that originated in present day Pakistan. The Bully Kutta is predominantly white in color. However, fawn, brindle, brown, black and various bi-colors are also common. These extra large dogs are usually about 35 inches (90 cm) tall and can weigh as much as 210 pounds (95 kg). The breed is generally docile, friendly, and very trainable.6

20.Dogue de Bordeaux

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/dogue-de-bordeaux/

Also referred to as Bordeaux mastiff or French mastiff, the Dogue de Bordeaux is one of the most ancient French dog breeds. It is a very powerful and muscular dog that has been put to work in many different capacities, from pulling carts and hauling heavy objects, to guarding flocks and property.

Despite it not being as tall as some other breeds on this list, the Dogue de Bordeaux has a dense and powerful build with males weighing in well over 150 pounds (68 kg). One of the distinctive features of the breed is a wide, massive head; claimed to be the largest head in the canine world, in proportion to the rest of the body. Unfortunately, these dogs are prone to numerous diseases and their average lifespan is one of the shortest among all breeds, usually ranging around 5 to 6 years.5

21.Landseer

Source: https://www.dogbreedinfo.com/landseer.htm

The Landseer is remarkably similar to Newfoundlands and some kennel clubs even consider the breed to be simply a black-and-white variant, but the international federation of kennel clubs recognizes it as a separate breed. Not surprising, its body proportions are also very similar to those of the Newfoundland, with males reaching heights of 32 inches (80 cm) and weighing in at about 180 pounds (over 80 kg). The Landseer is known for its unusually sweet disposition, gentleness, and serenity, as well as for being quicker and more responsive than regular Newfoundlands, which makes them easier to train.4

22.Cane Corso

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/cane-corso/

Closely related to the Neapolitan mastiff, the Cane Corso is another Italian breed valued as a great hunter and guardian. It is well muscled but less bulky than most other mastiff breeds. It’s also slightly smaller than the Neapolitan mastiff, reaching a height of about 28 inches (70 cm) at the withers and weighing anywhere from 88 to 110 pounds (40 to 50 kg).3

23.Tibetan Mastiff

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/tibetan-mastiff/

Originally bred by nomadic cultures of Tibet, China, Nepal, and Central Asia, the Tibetan mastiff is an ancient breed of a large, muscular dog with a thick, usually dark coat. Its name is misleading, however, as it’s not actually a mastiff at all and is in fact more closely related the the mountain dogs.  Males can reach heights of up to 33 inches (83 cm) and weigh between 100-160 pounds (45–72 kg), and they have even been known to take down wolves and leopards that threaten their herds.2

24.Kuvasz

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/kuvasz/

The Kuvasz is a breed of ancient Hungarian dog that was originally used for guarding livestock. It is a big dog with a dense white double coat which ranges from wavy to straight in texture. Although it may not be as robust and bulky as the Swiss mountain dogs and great Pyrenees, they’re still large and agile enough to help the shepherds protect their herds. The Kuvasz is a smart and intelligent breed and is sometimes even described as having a clown-like sense of humor.1

25.Saint Bernard

Source: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/st-bernard/

Originally bred for mountain rescue, the Saint Bernard is a giant dog breed popular in Italian and Swiss Alps. Its proportions are enormous – the dogs can be up to 3 feet (91 cm) tall and weigh as much as 265 pounds (120 kg). The heaviest Saint Bernard ever recorded though was called Benedictine and weighed an incredible 366 pounds (166 kg). Another Saint Bernard, Barry, was famous for saving somewhere between 40 and 100 human lives in the mountains.

26. Siberian Husky

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Huskies are relatively small by big-dog standards; some fail to exceed 40 pounds in weight, and even the tallest are less than 2-feet-tall. However, their long fur and boundless energy make them seem bigger than they are.

Huskies can run, jump and play for hours, and it is very difficult to wear them out. Leave a husky to lounge about in a small apartment all day and you may find your home ripped apart when you return.

27. Bull Terrier

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Bull terriers are smart, affectionate and energetic dogs, who come in a few different color patterns, including white (with or without other colors). Many have adorable eye patches or facial masks, but all-white bull terriers aren’t uncommon.

Bull terriers are instantly recognizable, thanks to their unusually shaped heads, which are often described as being egg-shaped.

Bull terriers range between 40 and 70 pounds or so and work best for big, active families, who want to include the family pet in most outings and plans.

28. Clumber Spaniel

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Sweet-tempered and laid-back, the Clumber Spaniel’s easy-going personality belies his skill and work ethic in the field. Originally bred to be bird-retrieving dogs, Clumber Spaniels don’t frantically chase after downed birds the way Labrador retrievers or German shorthaired pointers may. Instead, they maintain a calm but determined pace, which helps them last during extended hunting sessions.

Clumber Spaniels are beefy by bird-dog standards, and they occasionally weigh 85 pounds or more. Their coats are mostly white, with yellow, orange or brown markings – usually located on the head or tail. Clumber Spaniels also have very large heads and their bodies look a little bit long for their bodies.

Their wiry coats tend to shed very heavily, so you’ll need to brush your Clumber Spaniel weekly to avoid being trapped under an avalanche of dog hair. However, they make great pets in most other respects. They have very reasonable energy levels and exercise requirements, they’re pretty sharp and most owners find them easy to train.

29. East Siberian Laika

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love


A relatively poorly known breed in the USA, the East Siberian Laika is essentially a husky-like breed that weighs about 50 pounds and stands a little shy of 2-feet-tall at the shoulder. They do appear to have a heavier bone structure than huskies do, and they aren’t quite as light on their feet either.

Historically used for hunting and sledding, East Siberian Laikas also perform admirably in guarding contexts. They are remarkably brave in the face of danger, and won’t hesitate to stand their ground against wolves, bears or other large predators. However, they’re typically quite friendly with people and loving of their families.

East Siberian Laikas come in a number of different colors and patterns, and some are almost uniformly white-coated. They have medium-long hair, which sheds relatively continuously, so they aren’t great for allergy sufferers.

30. Ukrainian Shepherd Dog

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Also called the South Russian Ovtcharka, the Ukrainian shepherd dog is an independent animal, who is one of the more intimidating white dog breeds on our list. They’re not only pretty big dogs, who often exceed the 100-pound mark and stand over 2-feet-tall at the shoulder, but they are also very brave dogs who won’t hesitate to stand their ground and assume a dominant posture.

Ukrainian shepherd dogs are easy-going canines, who were originally developed for flock-guarding purposes. They don’t require a lot of attention, and they love having a large property to roam, monitor and protect. Their long white coats provide great protection from the elements, and they don’t shed as badly as you may suspect.

A Guide on Giant Guard Dog Breeds

 Having a dog is a great way for people, children especially, to develop a sense of responsibility and be more familiar with taking care of our animal friends. And depending on the owner’s lifestyle, there are many types of dogs that people can choose from. So whether you want an eye seeing dog, or a watchdog or a family pet, there is a type of dog that would fit in perfectly with your family. For this article, we’ll concentrate more on giant guard dog breeds.

Giant guard dog breeds in general are known for their strength and size. Their physical attributes make them perfect for manual labor tasks and activities that would put their capabilities to good use. Also, these types of dogs make great companions for people who have a wide-open space that will allow their pet dogs to run around in. They can certainly be a smart choice for people who like activities such as hunting. With their keen sense of observation, you can be sure that you’ll have a very smart animal companion. But you need to make sure that once you choose to buy or adopt a large dog, you’ll be able to maintain its upkeep, specifically with regards to its need for stimulating mental, and physical activities.

If you want a pet dog that you can also rely on to help you with laborious activities and be a loyal companion for life, then get yourself a dog from the giant guard dog breeds. It will prove to be a true best friend in the end.

See Also

1. Long Live Dog Breeds And How Long Dog Can Live

2. 4 Most Common Skin Conditions That Affect Dogs And Treatment

3. The Cockapoo – A Mix of The Poodle and Cocker Spaniel Breeds

4. Types of Poodles and Poodle Breeds

5. 5 Best Dog Vitamins in 2020

6. Big Dog Breeds

7. Dog Grooming Shampoos Can Improve the Condition of Your Pet

8. Why Are Poodles Popular?

9. Tips About the Golden Retriever Breed

10. Top Biting Dog Breeds

17 BIG WHITE DOGS YOU CAN’T HELP BUT LOVE

big white dogs

The 17 Big White Dogs

Given the criteria explained above, the following 17 big white dog breeds clearly represent some of the most appealing pets available. Just be sure to consider your family’s needs, lifestyle, and desires when making your choice.

1. Samoyed

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Samoyeds are relatively small by big dog standards, as most only weigh about 45 to 60 pounds. However, they may stand up to 2-feet-high at the shoulder, and they have long fluffy coats, so they certainly project a big white dog vibe.

Samoyeds are pretty well-rounded dogs, who have historically been used for herding, hunting game and dragging heavy loads across snow-covered landscapes.

Hailing from Siberia, Samoyeds feel right at home in cold climates, thanks to their long and ultra-dense white furry coats.

But unfortunately, these luxurious coats tend to shed profusely, which can leave everything you own coated in a layer of white fur. Regular grooming is a necessity to keep their coats healthy and looking its best.

Samoyeds are fun-loving, affectionate and smart, but they’re occasionally a handful for first-time owners, and they can be tricky to train. For example, they’re famous for launching themselves toward squirrels, birds and other animals at full speed.

Bull terriers are smart, affectionate and energetic dogs, who come in a few different color patterns, including white (with or without other colors). Many have adorable eye patches or facial masks, but all-white bull terriers aren’t uncommon.

2. Bull Terrier

Bull terriers are instantly recognizable, thanks to their unusually shaped heads, which are often described as being egg-shaped.

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Most bull terriers are ridiculously friendly with people, but because they were originally bred as fighting dogs, some individuals are still a little prickly with other canines. Bull terriers bond strongly with their people and do not tolerate boredom well. In fact, many develop problematic chewing behaviors if not adequately exercised and stimulated.

Bull terriers range between 40 and 70 pounds or so and work best for big, active families, who want to include the family pet in most outings and plans.

3. The Great Pyrenees

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Perhaps the largest white breed on our list (in terms of average size – the largest Great Danes are taller and heavier than the largest Great Pyrenees), Great Pyrenees are enormous dogs, with long, shaggy coats that make them appear even larger than they actually are. This makes the dogs appear quite foreboding to wolves and other predators, who may threaten the flocks they’re often tasked with protecting.

Because these giant white dogs were often left to live outdoors with their flocks, Pyrenees are pretty independent dogs. They still make good family pets for those with the kind of space these dogs require, but they aren’t as clingy as many other breeds – they won’t hesitate to wander off if the urge strikes them.

The Great Pyrenees are white furry dogs that shed quite heavily, so they aren’t great for those who demand a tidy home. They can also present significant training challenges, which makes them a poor choice for novice pet owners.

4. Afghan Hound

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

One of the oldest breeds in the world, the Afghan hound was originally produced in the hot deserts and cold mountains of Afghanistan, where they were tasked with hunting large prey (including leopards and other formidable quarry). They are natural-born runners, who can maintain very high speeds for long distances.

But despite the serious work they were developed to handle, Afghans make great pets for some people. They’re intensely loyal and affectionate with their owners, but they have an absurd and comical demeanor, which will make you smile and laugh time and again.

Of course, the first thing most people notice about Afghan hounds is their long, silky coat. Afghans come in a variety of colors and patterns, but many are all white. These leggy and lithe dogs may stand up to 28 inches tall at the shoulder, but they rarely weigh more than about 60 pounds.

5. Clumber Spaniel

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Sweet-tempered and laid-back, the Clumber Spaniel’s easy-going personality belies his skill and work ethic in the field. Originally bred to be bird-retrieving dogs, Clumber Spaniels don’t frantically chase after downed birds the way Labrador retrievers or German shorthaired pointers may. Instead, they maintain a calm but determined pace, which helps them last during extended hunting sessions.

Clumber Spaniels are beefy by bird-dog standards, and they occasionally weigh 85 pounds or more. Their coats are mostly white, with yellow, orange or brown markings – usually located on the head or tail. Clumber Spaniels also have very large heads and their bodies look a little bit long for their bodies.

Their wiry coats tend to shed very heavily, so you’ll need to brush your Clumber Spaniel weekly to avoid being trapped under an avalanche of dog hair. However, they make great pets in most other respects. They have very reasonable energy levels and exercise requirements, they’re pretty sharp and most owners find them easy to train.

6. Kuvasz

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

The Kuvasz is another flock-guarding breed, who hails from the farms and fields of Hungary. Tasked with protecting sheep and other livestock from dangerous predators, the Kuvasz (plural: Kuvaszok) is brave, independent and quick to act.

Kuvaszok weigh up to 110 pounds, and they are typically clad in long, white fur, which helps farmers to distinguish them from wolves at a glance.

The Kuvasz is not a good choice for apartment dwellers or people who cannot or will not provide members of the breed with plenty of exercise. They’ve been known to jog for 15 mile-long-stretches when necessary, and they will become quite destructive and miserable if forced to live in a tiny home or yard.

Additionally, while they are quite intelligent, Kuvaszok are often very difficult to train – especially for novice owners. They are often affectionate, loving and loyal to their families, but they regard strangers – including children, in some cases – with suspicion.

7. Siberian Husky

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Most huskies have quite a bit of dark fur, but some breeders produce all-white or mostly-white lines. When this long, dense, white fur is combined with the ice-blue eyes many Huskies have, the results are quite stunning.

Huskies are relatively small by big-dog standards; some fail to exceed 40 pounds in weight, and even the tallest are less than 2-feet-tall. However, their long fur and boundless energy make them seem bigger than they are.

Although they are one of the more popular breeds, Siberian Huskies present a few challenges for owners. For example, their energy levels and exercise requirements are off the charts.

Huskies can run, jump and play for hours, and it is very difficult to wear them out. Leave a husky to lounge about in a small apartment all day and you may find your home ripped apart when you return.

Huskies are shedding machines, so allergy-sufferers and neat freaks should choose one of the other big white dog breeds on this list. However, those who are willing and able to provide their pet with plenty of exercise and won’t mind living in a fur-covered home, huskies can be very sweet, loving and entertaining companions.

8. Dogo Argentino

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Dogo Argentinos (or, Argentinian mastiffs, as they are often called) are big and bold dogs, who are fierce and ferocious in the face of danger, yet loving and gentle with their families.

Typically measuring about 24 to 27 inches tall at the shoulder and weighing about 80 to 100 pounds, these large white dogs were originally developed to hunt wild boars and other dangerous prey.

Dogo Argentinos are rarely a good choice for beginners; they require a firm, yet loving leader, who will maintain discipline, yet still allow plenty of time for fun and games. They also need plenty of socialization when they’re young, to prevent them from being aggressive around visitors.

They are typically all white, although some individuals may have dark facial markings. They don’t shed very heavily, and their short hair length helps to minimize the problems even further. So, they make a great choice for experienced owners, who want a big white dog that doesn’t require a lot of grooming or maintenance.

9. East Siberian Laika

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

A relatively poorly known breed in the USA, the East Siberian Laika is essentially a husky-like breed that weighs about 50 pounds and stands a little shy of 2-feet-tall at the shoulder. They do appear to have a heavier bone structure than huskies do, and they aren’t quite as light on their feet either.

Historically used for hunting and sledding, East Siberian Laikas also perform admirably in guarding contexts. They are remarkably brave in the face of danger, and won’t hesitate to stand their ground against wolves, bears or other large predators. However, they’re typically quite friendly with people and loving of their families.

East Siberian Laikas come in a number of different colors and patterns, and some are almost uniformly white-coated. They have medium-long hair, which sheds relatively continuously, so they aren’t great for allergy sufferers.

They require plenty of exercise and a few durable dog toys to keep their mind’s busy, or they can develop problematic behaviors, such as destructive chewing or obsessive digging.

10. Komondor

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

The Komondor is one of the most unique-looking breeds in the world, thanks to its long, corded white coat, which helps it blend in with the sheep it is often expected to guard.

And while Komondors exhibit most of the traits that other flock-guarding breeds do, including bravery, intelligence, and independence, they are better suited for family life in several ways.

For starters, they’re often incredibly affectionate with and protective of their owners. They also have less energy – and therefore require less exercise – than many other flock-guarding breeds do. They still require daily walks and regular playtime, but they’ll fit into your home better than Great Pyrenees or Kuvaszok will.

However, they are still guard dogs at heart, who won’t hesitate to defend their families from perceived threats. Unfortunately, this can include neighbors, visitors, and the TV repair technician.

So, it is important to socialize Komondors heavily during puppyhood and instill a solid sense of hierarchy, with you sitting at the top of the pyramid.

11. Poodle

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Perhaps the ultimate big white fluffy dog, the standard poodle makes a fantastic family pet. They are high-maintenance animals, who require very frequent grooming, but they have a lot to offer in return.

Poodles are very sweet, smart and well-behaved companions, who are often used in therapy contexts. And believe it or not, poodles are also quite protective, and they make pretty good guard dogs.

Their iconic white furry coats (which come in white as well as several other colors) shed very little and are often described as being “hypoallergenic.”

And, while all dogs shed, and no dog is truly hypoallergenic, poodles do appear to be great breeds for those with allergies. In fact, they’ve been crossed with other breeds (such as Labrador retrievers and Cocker Spaniels) because of their allergy-friendly fur.

Poodles come in three different sizes (standard, toy, and miniature), but we’ll leave the two small varieties for others to cover – we’re big dog fans. Standard poodles are pretty big white dogs, who usually weigh between 50 and 75 pounds, and the tallest individuals measure about 20 or 21 inches tall at the shoulder.

12. Ukrainian Shepherd Dog

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Also called the South Russian Ovtcharka, the Ukrainian shepherd dog is an independent animal, who is one of the more intimidating white dog breeds on our list. They’re not only pretty big dogs, who often exceed the 100-pound mark and stand over 2-feet-tall at the shoulder, but they are also very brave dogs who won’t hesitate to stand their ground and assume a dominant posture.

Ukrainian shepherd dogs are easy-going canines, who were originally developed for flock-guarding purposes. They don’t require a lot of attention, and they love having a large property to roam, monitor and protect. Their long white coats provide great protection from the elements, and they don’t shed as badly as you may suspect.

This is a white furry dog breed for experienced owners, who understand how to maintain strict discipline and maintain a dominant position against a dog who will assert his own dominance if given the opportunity to do so. Puppy socialization is imperative if the breed is to be kept as a pet.

13. Slovensky Cuvac

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Standing around 2-feet-tall and weighing around 100 pounds (females typically weigh a little less), the Slovensky Cuvac is yet another flock-guarding breed, with a fluffy white coat.

Energetic, somewhat puppy-like and, as the AKC describes them, “lively,” these are spirited dogs, who need plenty of exercise and a big yard to patrol.

Slovensky Cuvacs don’t require very much grooming (although it’s a good idea to have them professionally groomed each Spring), but they are pretty heavy shedders, like many of the other long-haired breeds on our list. However, this long fur serves them well when they must sleep outdoors in cold climates, such as their birthplace – the Slovakian Mountains.

Slovensky Cuvacs are very brave and protective, and they’ve been known to face down bears, wolves, and coyotes without showing an ounce of fear. They aren’t lap dogs and won’t follow you around like a shadow, but they do bond strongly with their families. This combination of bravery and loyalty helps make them fantastic guard dogs.

14. Maremma Sheepdog

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

The Maremma Sheepdog is a large flock-guarding breed that hails from Italy. They are quite similar to most other flock-guarding breeds, insofar as they’re intelligent, confident and independent dogs, who like to patrol large territories. They are often a good choice for families who leave the house for long periods of time, provided that they have a suitably big yard to guard.

However, Maremma sheepdogs do exhibit a few differences from most other sheepdogs. The most striking example being their affectionate nature. They won’t puppy-dog you as a Doberman or Chihuahua may, but they love hanging out quietly with their families. Often, they’ll lean up against one or more members of the family, and it appears physical contact comforts them.

Maremma sheepdogs are quite intelligent, but novice pet owners will often find them difficult to train. Generally speaking, they’re more interested in doing what they want to do, than they are following your instructions. However, they make loyal, low-maintenance companions for those with sufficient space to provide.

15. Tatra

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Also called the Polish Tatra Sheepdog, or a similar variation on this theme, the Tatra is a big white furry dog, who occasionally stands 28 inches tall at the shoulder.

The biggest individuals weigh about 130 pounds or so, but most hover around the 100-pound mark putting the Tatra into the giant white dog category.

When hanging out with their families, Tatras are gentle and loving pets, who get along well with children. However, they are entirely different when patrolling their territories – particularly at night.

They’ll aggressively challenge any perceived threats, and they’re often quite vocal, which can cause problems with light-sleeping neighbors.

Tatras are very fluffy dogs, with a thick double coat that helps keep them warm while guarding their flocks. The underlayer is remarkably dense and soft, but the outer layer can feel stiff in some individuals.

They are pretty heavy shedders, like many of the other white fluffy dogs on our list, so you’ll want to brush them frequently to remove shed hairs preemptively.

16. White American Shepherd

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

White American shepherds are essentially German shepherds with white coats. The details of their origin are often debated, and they’re recognized differently by different breed registries. B

ut, from an everyday pet owner’s point of view, most of what can be said of German shepherds can also be said of white American shepherds.

Like the Black German Shepherd, white American shepherds are very intelligent dogs, who typically bond very strongly with their people.

In fact, they’re a bit unusual among the big white dog breeds on our list, in that they typically look to their owners for instruction, rather than relying on their own judgment. Accordingly, they excel in obedience trials, agility work and other contexts that require them to work closely with a handler.

White American shepherds do not enjoy being left alone for long periods of time, and they require plenty of daily exercise to prevent them from becoming destructive or mischievous.

They are very heavy shedders, so you’ll want to bathe and groom them regularly to help knock some of their hair off preemptively.

17. Borzoi

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Unlike many of the flock-guarding breeds on this list, who tend to hold humans at arm’s length, the Borzoi is a great companion, who loves to hang out with his owners all day long.

But despite the breed’s laid-back and loving demeanor, the Borzoi was initially developed to, among other things, hunt wolves in rural Russia. However, despite being so brave and capable, they aren’t really that protective, so they make poor guard dogs.

Borzois vary significantly in terms of size. Some individuals weigh only 50 pounds or so, but most are pretty big dogs, who weigh between 85 and 100 pounds.

The largest individuals may even reach 32-inches in height at the shoulder. They have a long and lean appearance, which hints at their exceptional running speed.

The Borzoi has a long coat that sheds heavily, and they require frequent grooming. They can get along with other pets, but they’ll have to be introduced to other animals carefully, as they have a strong and well-developed prey drive.

Special Considerations for Large White Dog Breeds

Coat color may seem like a relatively insignificant characteristic of dogs, but it actually creates a number of tangible differences for owners. This is especially true of white dogs.

We’ll explain a few of the most important things to consider when choosing a big white fluffy dog breed for your family.

Fluffy White Coats Vs. Smooth White Coats

Coat length is one of the most important considerations for owners seeking a white-furred canine. Dogs with longer fur often shed more heavily than their short-haired counterparts do. This means owners who suffer from allergies or prefer a very neat living space will want to opt for a short-haired large dog breed.

Large long-haired dog breeds also require more frequent grooming than short-haired breeds do. Sometimes, a simple weekly brushing will suffice, but some of the other large white dog breeds will require a complete grooming session on a monthly basis.

You can learn to groom your dog yourself, but many owners will opt to have a professional handle these duties. In either case, fluffy white dogs will require you to invest more time or money to keep their coats looking good.

Dirt and Stains: The Bane of the Big White Dog

Like anything other white or light-colored fibers, white dog hair can become stained very easily.

So, it is important to choose grooming products (such as shampoos) carefully. It is also important to avoid cheaply made leashes and harnesses, as the color may bleed onto your dog’s fur if these items become wet.

Dirt can also present problems for white-coated dogs, especially the fur near their paws and along their sides – the places in most frequent contact with the ground.

There’s not much you can do to prevent this for dogs who spend long periods outdoors, but you may want to bathe indoor dogs a little more frequently than usual to help keep them looking their best.

White Dogs (Particularly White Fluffy Dog Breeds) Look Bigger Than They Are

White reflects more light than other colors, which means that white fur can help make dogs look bigger than darker furs usually do. Sometimes, this is a good thing, but it isn’t always desirable.

For example, if you want a big dog to help protect your home and family, white fur will help exaggerate their size.

On the other hand, if you are a big dog lover, who’s trying to dance around size requirements or remain below your landlord’s pet-size threshold, a white dog may be a bad choice.

Instead, you’ll probably want to look for a dark-colored dog, whose color will make them appear somewhat smaller.

Big White Dogs You Can’t Help But Love

Do you share your home with a big white fluffy dog? We’d love to hear all about him. Let us know what breed you chose, your favorite things about him and some of the most common challenges he presents.

source: https://canineweekly.com/big-white-dogs/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *